Category Archives: Work Remotely

Secrets of the Incredible Benefits of Massage Therapy

Massage: Get in touch with its many benefits

Originally Published: January 12th, 2021 Massage can be a powerful tool to help you take charge of your health and well-being. See if it’s right for you. By Mayo Clinic Staff


Massage used to be available only through luxury spas and upscale health clubs. Today, massage therapy is offered in businesses, clinics, hospitals, and even airports. If you’ve never tried massage, learn about its possible health benefits and what to expect during a massage therapy session.

What is massage?

Massage is a general term for pressing, rubbing, and manipulating your skin, muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Massage may range from light stroking to deep pressure. There are many different types of massage, including these common types:

  • Swedish massage. This is a gentle form of massage that uses long strokes, kneading, deep circular movements, vibration, and tapping. It helps you feel relaxed and energized.
  • Deep massage. This massage technique uses slower, more forceful strokes to target the deeper layers of muscle and connective tissue. It’s commonly used to help with muscle damage from injuries.
  • Sports massage. This is similar to Swedish massage, but it’s geared toward people involved in sports activities to help prevent or treat injuries.
  • Trigger point massage. This massage focuses on areas of tight muscle fibers that can form in your muscles after injuries or overuse.

Benefits of massage

Massage is generally considered part of integrative medicine. It’s increasingly being offered along with standard treatment for a wide range of medical conditions and situations.

Massage benefits can include:

  • Reducing stress and increasing relaxation
  • Reducing pain and muscle soreness and tension
  • Improving circulation, energy, and alertness
  • Lowering heart rate and blood pressure
  • Improving immune function

While more research is needed to confirm the benefits of massage, some studies have found massage may also be helpful for:

  • Anxiety
  • Digestive disorders
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Headaches
  • Insomnia related to stress
  • Low back pain
  • Myofascial pain syndrome
  • Nerve pain
  • Soft tissue strains or injuries
  • Sports injuries
  • Temporomandibular joint pain
  • Upper back and neck pain

Beyond the benefits for specific conditions or diseases, some people enjoy massage because it often produces feelings of caring, comfort, and connection.

Despite its benefits, massage isn’t meant as a replacement for regular medical care. Let your doctor know you’re trying massage and be sure to follow any standard treatment plans you have.

Risks of massage

Most people can benefit from massage. However, massage may not be appropriate if you have:

  • Bleeding disorders or take blood-thinning medication
  • Burns or healing wounds
  • Deep vein thrombosis
  • Infections
  • Broken bones (fractures)
  • Severe osteoporosis
  • A very low platelet count (severe thrombocytopenia)

Discuss the pros and cons of massage with your doctor, especially if you are pregnant or if you have cancer or unexplained pain.

Some forms of massage can leave you feeling a bit sore the next day. But massage shouldn’t ordinarily be painful or uncomfortable. If any part of your massage doesn’t feel right or is painful, speak up right away. Most serious problems come from too much pressure during massage.

What you can expect during a massage

You don’t need any special preparation for massage. Before a massage therapy session starts, your massage therapist should ask you about any symptoms, your medical history, and what you’re hoping to get out of the massage. Your massage therapist should explain the kind of massage and techniques he or she will use.

In a typical massage therapy session, you undress or wear loose-fitting clothing. Undress only to the point that you’re comfortable. You generally lie on a table and cover yourself with a sheet. Your massage therapist will leave the room when you undress before the massage and when you dress after it. You can also have a massage while sitting in a chair, fully clothed. Your massage therapist should perform an evaluation through touch to locate painful or tense areas and to determine how much pressure to apply.

Depending on preference, your massage therapist may use oil or lotion to reduce friction on your skin. Tell your massage therapist if you might be allergic to any ingredients.

A massage session may last from 10 to 90 minutes, depending on the type of massage and how much time you have. No matter what kind of massage you choose, you should feel calm and relaxed during and after your massage. Breathe normally throughout your massage.

Your massage therapist may play music during your massage or talk to you, but you can tell him or her if you prefer quiet.

If a massage therapist is pushing too hard, ask for lighter pressure. Occasionally you may have a sensitive spot in a muscle that feels like a knot. It’s likely to be uncomfortable while your massage therapist works it out. But if it becomes painful, speak up.

Finding a massage therapist

Ask your doctor or someone else you trust for a recommendation. Most states regulate massage therapists through licensing, registration, or certification requirements.

Don’t be afraid to ask a potential massage therapist such questions as:

  • Are you licensed, certified, or registered?
  • What are your training and experience?
  • How many massage therapy sessions do you think I’ll need?
  • What’s the cost, and is it covered by health insurance?

The take-home message about massage

Brush aside any thoughts that massage is only a feel-good way to indulge or pamper yourself. On the contrary, massage can be a powerful tool to help you take charge of your health and well-being, whether you have a specific health condition or are just looking for another stress reliever. You can even learn how to do self-massage or how to engage in massage with a partner at home.


How to Work Remotely and Succeed

Does Remote Work Really Work? 4 CEOs on the Future of Their Workplaces

BY CHRISTINE LAGORIO-CHAFKIN@LAGORIO

Does Remote Work Really Work? 4 CEOs on the Future of Their Workplaces
Is work … a place? Founders are divided on whether to return to their old way of doing business.

Founders and executives around the globe have taken lessons learned over the past year to inform their view of what their workplace will look like in the future. At this week’s Collision conference, the future of the workplace was top-of-mind–though founders had a wide diversity of expectations about how their companies will work coming out of the pandemic. Here are a few of the most fascinating.

More satisfied, talented, global workforces

Phil Libin, the founder of Evernote, All Turtles, and upstart video-presentation platform Mmhmm, says having gone all-virtual has given his company superpowers–and he’s not willing to give those up by returning to a physical office. He has vowed with his most recent two companies that his teams will never return to offices post-pandemic. The first superpower he cited was the ability to hire talent not just locally–but anywhere in the world. “All of our job listings say ‘global,'” he said Wednesday. “I’m never putting the ‘in’ back in place.”

Second superpower: not commuting. “Why would I ever give up the superpower of giving every person on my team two extra hours a day?” And third: helping employees avoid the extreme expense of housing in major cities. “Why could every person on my team not live in a nice house with a nice school district, if that’s what they want?” he says.

Article continues after sponsored contentTHE UPS STORESPONSORED CONTENTSmall Biz Challenge: The Roundtable Discussion Event on Thursday, May 6

Remote work requires different processes than office work

Jason Fried, the founder of Basecamp and author of Remote: Office Not Required, is firmly anti-Zoom and pro-asynchronous work at his all-remote company, which makes tools for employee communication. Now that much of the rest of the office-worker world has experienced remote work over the past year, he’s hoping other companies embrace a bigger idea: that the nature and strengths of remote work are very different than in-person work.

For employees on dedicated projects, requiring focus or creative critical thinking, working remotely can be far more productive than working in an office, he says. But a lot of companies are doing it wrong–allowing the digital distractions of constant Slack notices and interruptions of Zoom meetings to disrupt the workflow afforded by solitary work at home. He advises helping employees manage their own time and get the most out of long stretches of solo work by keeping important decisions out of real-time chat. “The expectation of immediate response is really toxic,” he says. “What’s healthy is giving people long stretches of time to do their work without … the pressure to pay attention to a dozen real-time decisions at once.”

Teams have the opportunity to work smarter and more empathically

Jonathan Notaro, the founder, and chief creative officer at Brand New School, a branding agency that works in production, said this year of all-remote work has made harnessing his teams’ creativity more challenging. “So much of our work happens through discourse,” he said at Collision Thursday. “Those pieces of magic are so much harder to harvest in this environment.”

But he’s seen bright spots–and moments that made his company stronger. Having Zoom windows into colleagues’ and employees’ homes has given him insight into their personal priorities and passions, and brought his team closer. “You start to think more about their personal lives,” he said, “because it’s right there. I think that’s been a real gem from this whole experience. It’s made us all closer.” Brand New School has had to think harder about scheduling and is more disciplined about meetings after a year of remote working. Notaro said: “I feel like we’ve become more focused.”

Office work and gathering will be a lot more exciting

The founder and CEO of Eventbrite, Julia Hartz, saw her company’s revenue drop to zero as the pandemic hit in March of 2020. After two rounds of financing and a company restructuring in the first 90 days of work-from-home, her company saw a boom in digital events. Now, as restrictions on gatherings lift around the globe, she’s expecting the physical event ecosystem to flourish as well. “We are heading into a Roaring ’20s! Never underestimate the power of humans who feel they deserve something,” she said.

As for the return to work, Hartz doesn’t expect all her employees immediately to start daily commuting but says since Eventbrite was founded on the premise of gathering in person, the company will continue to operate office “hubs” around the world where employees can work and meet. “If we do it right, people will look forward to coming to the office, to see each other and to collaborate,” she said.Inc. helps entrepreneurs change the world. Get the advice you need to start, grow, and lead your business today. Subscribe here for unlimited access.

RELATED:

The Benefits of Working From Home: Why The Pandemic Isn’t the Only Reason to Work Remotely | FlexJobs

Working from home 101: Every remote worker’s guide to the essential tools for telecommuting | ZDNet