Tag Archives: WHY INFLUENCER MARKETING ISN’T “SELLING OUT”

How To Learn About Entrepreneurship From Colonel Sanders

The 7 Inspiring Lessons Colonel Sanders Can Teach Us About Entrepreneurship

Published 2 days ago

on Aug 30, 2020

By Graham Chapman


Colonel Sanders was rejected exactly 1009 times before he was able to sell his KFC recipe successfully. In addition to this, he failed at every job he even turned his hand to during his life. After a lifetime of facing failure after failure, he finally sold KFC at the ripe old age of 75.

In this blog, we’ll be covering seven of the inspiring lessons that the Colonel’s entrepreneurial journey can teach us, and whether you’re 25 or 75 years old, there’s something here for any budding entrepreneur.

The TW3 Work From Home Business Opportunity Is Right For You. Click Here To Learn More!

Lesson #1: Failure Breeds Success

As I mentioned, the Colonel was rejected over a thousand times before he was successfully able to sell his Kentucky Fried Chicken recipe – that’s a lot of rejection. Not only that, but Sanders failed miserably at every other career he ever attempted. Between the ages of ten and forty, Sanders tried his hand at the following, among other things:

  • Streetcar conducting
  • Farming
  • Law
  • Sales
  • Fire fighting

This just goes to show that no matter how much you experience failure, there’s still time, no matter how old you are, which brings us neatly onto our next lesson.

“I’ve only had two rules. Do all you can and do it the best you can. It’s the only way you ever get that feeling of accomplishing something.” – Colonel Sanders

Lesson #2: It’s Never Too Late

When Colonel Sanders was 75, he finally sold KFC for $2 million (roughly $15 million today). Can you imagine experiencing such a win, after a lifetime of losing? I’ve met people during my career who think they’re over the hill by the time they’re in their thirties! Yet the Colonel ploughed on in the face of adversity and ended up as the founder and face of a brand we’re still so familiar with over five decades later. 

Lesson #3: The Past is In the Past

In order to be successful as an entrepreneur, many people simply need to learn that the past is in the past, and it will only define your future chance of success if you allow it to. It doesn’t matter how many times you’ve failed, where you’ve come from or what negative things you’ve experienced or done in the past.

Your past doesn’t hold the keys to your future success. The Colonel failed at every career he ever attempted. He even spent much of his life in an unhappy marriage, ending in divorce and had to provide for three children by the time he was nineteen. For most, that’d be enough for them to settle down into an unfulfilling career, but the Colonel pressed on with faith in his own abilities and principles. 

Lesson #4: Giving Up is the Only Way to Fail

Failure is a natural side effect of life; the story of Kentucky Fried Chicken tells us that quitting is the only failure. If you have the same outlook and faith in what you’re trying to do, the possibility of significant success is never off the table. Even when you see the clock is ticking and the days and years are flashing by, there’s no time limit on being a success. Never stop searching for that light at the end of the tunnel.

Lesson #5: A Fresh Start is Sometimes All You Need

It’s clear to us now that cooking was a passion of the Colonel’s, but he didn’t discover his enthusiasm until much later in his life. It’s only through having the courage to fail and start over, again and again, that he was able to discover his real calling. 

When you try to succeed at multiple disciplines, it’s a sure-fire way to burn yourself out. The start is always the hard part, and for most, the idea of doing it over and over again, in their 50s, 60s and 70s would be absolutely exhausting. The energy and passion that the Colonel showed by doing this well into his seventies is an inspiring lesson to any entrepreneur. 

Lesson #6: Take a Leap of Faith

It’s no great shock to learn that following your heart’s desire is often the key to success, happiness and contentment. How is it then, that so many of us won’t chase after what we truly want from life? Sitting back and relaxing into your comfort zone means that many of us don’t realize how vital passion and desire really are. In the end, the pursuit of a passion will make anyone happy, contented and prosperous. 

“One has to remember that every failure can be a stepping stone to something better.” – Colonel Sanders

Lesson #7: Keep it Simple

It seems crazy to say it, but Kentucky Fried Chicken started by selling chicken on the side of the road. After selling his recipe, the business grew rapidly, and these days it’s commonplace to see KFC franchises in countries all over the world – 145 to be exact. The lesson here is never to be afraid of keeping things simple. So long as you’re willing to start, work hard and keep at it, things will grow. 

It’s often the case that would-be entrepreneurs will put off starting their venture, launching their website or whatever it might be because they simply don’t believe they are big enough to make a start.

 RELATED TOPICS: COLONEL SANDERSENTREPRENEURSHIPEXPERIENCING FAILUREFAILUREHOW TO OVERCOME FAILUREKFCPERSEVERANCERISKSUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEURSTAKING RISKSDON’T MISSWomen Trailblazers: The Most Successful Female Founder in Every Country

Graham Chapman

Graham Chapman is a sustainable product and business expert and owner of powerguard.co.uk.


5 Reasons Now Is the Best Time to Start Your Own Business

 

GE, GM, IBM, Disney, HP, Hyatt, Trader Joe’s, FedEx, and Microsoft were founded during hard times.


BY GEOFFREY JAMES, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR, INC.COM@SALES_SOURCE

5 Reasons Now Is the Best Time to Start Your Own Business

Yes, due to cosmically inept handling of a major pandemic, most of the economy is tanking. Yes, businesses with less than 500 employees are going belly-up at twice the rate of larger firms. And, yes, traditional “mom and pop” businesses are disappearing by the thousands every day.

Nevertheless, this is the best time to start a small business, for five reasons:

1. There are unmet needs everywhere.

A famous entrepreneur once told me that every time you hear a person swearing when using a product or service, it’s an opportunity to sell them something better. Or, put another way, misery loves companies.

While there are some products (like smartphones) that satisfy needs that people didn’t know they had, most successful products fulfill needs of which people (i.e. potential customers) are painfully aware.

There’s plenty of pain out there right now (and plenty of swearing) which means there are endless opportunities to create sustainable businesses that help people cope with this perfect storm of disruptions.

The TW3 Work From Home Business Opportunity is Right for You. Click Here to Learn More!

2. There’s a huge pool of available talent.

When businesses and industries collapse unemployment grows. While government bailouts have kept the economy from sinking entirely, it looks inevitable that the economy is going to take a major hit, which means even more people out of work.

In the past, small businesses–the very businesses taking the brunt of a bumbling government–have employed about half of U.S. workers. Millions of valued, experienced, hard-working employees are in the market for a new job.

Under these circumstances, creating a business that hires people is a good deed on its own merits. And with so much talent to choose from, you should be able to assemble a team that can take on any challenge.

3. Marketing has never been cheaper.

As businesses fold up shop, they naturally stop advertising, which inevitably means that ad rates go down. This means that it won’t cost your startup all that much to achieve local, national or even international visibility.

The Number 1 Discount Healthcare, Dentalcare, RX, and Visioncare Plan in America.
This is Ameriplan USA. Click Here to Learn More!

4. Potential competitors are in disarray.

Some large companies, like Amazon or Zoom, lucked out because they provided a product or service that exactly matched a major need resulting from the pandemic. Large companies, however, find it difficult to change even under normal circumstances and thost that haven’t lucked out have been caught flat-footed.

This means that you can start a company even in a market that has dominant players without worrying about them squishing you like a bug because, frankly, they’ve got bigger fish to fry. (Apologies for the mixed metaphors.)

5. The post-COVID recovery is inevitable.

As awful as things are today, there will inevitably come a time when the pandemic and resulting depression will be over. Companies that will have adapted to thrive in these troubled times will be perfectly positioned to take off when the nightmare is over.

Companies founded during hard times in the past include General Electric, General Motors, IBM, Disney, HP, Hyatt, Trader Joe’s, Fedex, and Microsoft. A lousy economy didn’t stop their founders. Don’t let today’s lousy economy stop you.AUG 26, 2020Like this column? Sign up to subscribe to email alerts and you’ll never miss a post.The opinions expressed here by Inc.com columnists are their own, not those of Inc.com.


ARE INFLUENCER’S THE NEW EDITORS IN CHIEF?

Influencer marketing is one of the most misunderstood concepts in business.
Garyvee
by GARYVEE
 @garyvee
4 days ago · 2 min read

Influencer marketing is one of the most misunderstood concepts in business.


There is no doubt in my mind that influencers are the next editors-in-chief. Which is to say, if an editor-in-chief dictates what comes out of an outlet that is trusted, say a Washington Post, an ABC Worldwide News, or what was Life Magazine–that’s exactly what’s happening with influencers.

Now, that audience respects that human and that human is endorsing that brand.

The Number 1 Work From Home Business Opportunity Market Place. Click Here to Learn More!

WHY INFLUENCER MARKETING ISN’T “SELLING OUT”

I would argue against the belief that influencer marketing is “selling out”. That, somehow, the audience doesn’t believe the influencer. I would argue, there’s an interesting depth and psychology behind influencer marketing. People that love somebody as an audience actively appreciate brands that subsidize that person’s life. Now, that influencer can continue to entertain or inform them the other 330 days a year. There’s a subconscious trade going on, between the audience and the brand that’s subsiding the livelihood of that influencer.

That brings almost a weird appreciation… like thank you _____ brand. If that brand wasn’t paying this influencer, they’d have to go back to working a regular paying job and their fans really enjoy their comedy, their looks, their information, and/or their content on a daily basis. 

HOW TO WORK WITH INFLUENCER’S

With this in mind, there are a few things to remember when working with influencers. In general, collaboration involves three things. Number one, influencers are underpriced and overpriced so really do your homework on who the influencer is. Do they have a manager that’s asking for a big number or are they just a regular person? Can you compensate them with your product or service for free?  That is always a good trade. 

Next, I think the way to work with influencers is to let them have 100% control of the context of the content. I am consistently blown away by the naiveté of brands that try to dictate to influencers how they should make the creative. It always feels awkward, it doesn’t land, and it doesn’t convert–even if the influencer says “Yes.” A lot of influencers have gotten smart enough to say no. 

TeleMedicine. Brought to You By the Number 1 Discount Health Care, Dental Care, RX, and Vision Care Plan in America. It is Like Having Your Own Doctor on Call 24/7. Click Here to Learn More!

Number three. Volume of an influencer marketing campaign matters. I talk a lot about volume content because I’m blown away by many brands. They do a campaign with six influencers and then decide if that’s good or not. We live in a world where there are tens of millions of micro and macro influencers in play for almost any brand on the earth. So, that’s something. That’s part of the strategy people should think about.

Hey VaynerNation! If you liked that article, it would mean a lot to me if you shared it on Twitter.